How to stop a divorce after filing papers? Of course it is! It’s your marriage, and it’s not as complicated as it may seem. This post will include a little “legal-eze”, even though we practice marriage counseling not law, we want to provide you with some legal advice so that you can begin restoring your marriage and do whatever it takes to reverse the damage that has been done thus far.


More inspiration about stopping divorce:


 What you need to do stop a divorce after filing papers.

marriage book

You are going to need your:

  • Lawyer
  • Copy of state divorce laws
  • Copy of divorce filing
  • The person that actually filed the papers is going to need to be the one to actually stop the divorce using the following steps. (Reprinted from Legalzoom.com)

    Step 1

    Go to the courthouse where you filed your petition for divorce and speak with the clerk. Tell her you want to stop the process and ask for the proper form you must file to achieve this. Although these forms are sometimes available on the Internet, different jurisdictions have different rules. If you confer with the court, you’ll be sure to get the right form.

    Step 2

    Complete the document. In most states, it is a simple one-page form that states that you are voluntarily dismissing or withdrawing your own case. You don’t owe the court an explanation for why you’ve made this decision.

    Step 3

    Take the completed document and several additional copies back to the court clerk. The clerk will stamp all your copies as “filed” and return at least one to you for your records and for service on your spouse.

    Step 4

    Serve your spouse with a copy of your dismissal if your state requires it. Not all do. In some jurisdictions, the court will send her a copy on your behalf. In other jurisdictions, you might have to give it to her yourself or mail her a copy by certified mail. Because she’s not required to do anything in response to it or defend herself against the document you’ve filed, you generally do not have to use a sheriff or private process server to give her a copy. You usually don’t have to file proof with the court that you’ve served her, but this might vary depending on where you live.

    One tip to note is that If you successfully dismiss your divorce and fail to reconcile, you will be required to start the divorce proceedings all over again.

    So make it count this time when you reconcile! Take responsibility for your part in the marriage problems and seek out marriage help this time that will work. There are lots of couples who have sought out marriage help the first time around only to have it fail.

    Much like a person with a terminal illness seeks out multiple diagnoses and second opinions, find the right marriage help until it actually works for you.

    We’ve seen even the worst of marriages (and spouses!) change over time with the right approach.

    We can help you stop your divorce with our 2 day private marriage therapy retreat. Contact us to find out more information about how it can help you.